The Carpenter Emperor of the Ming Dynasty

Anyone who was Emperor of China would have been, in their age, one of the world’s most powerful men, if not the most powerful. Emperor Xizhong of the Ming Dynasty, although ascending to this position, decided not to look after state affairs but instead to become a carpenter and immerse himself in woodwork. We trace his story. Continue reading The Carpenter Emperor of the Ming Dynasty

Could WW1 Have Been Avoided?

A hundred years ago, the First World War was started after Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo by a group of Serbian nationalists. People ever since have wondered the question of whether the war could have been averted, or at least postponed. After all, if 20 million casualties would result from something as small as the assassination of just one man, then surely there must have been a way the war could have been avoided? Continue reading Could WW1 Have Been Avoided?

Letters From The Past: Lenin Warning The Communist Party

gif-leninDecember 25th, 1922

By the stability of the Central Committee, of which I spoke before, I mean measures to prevent a split, so far as such measures can be taken. For, of course, the White Guard in Russkaaya Maysl (I think it was S.E. Oldenburg) was right when, in the first place, in his play against Soviet Russia he banked on the hope of a split in our party, and when, in the second place, he banked for that split on serious disagreements  in our party. Continue reading Letters From The Past: Lenin Warning The Communist Party

Rome vs Carthage- Part 2: Trouble in Sicily

A small group of unemployed mercenaries that seized a city in the island of Sicily. That managed to provoke a series of wars that were incredibly large, costly and bloody and would consume the western Mediterranean. This is a story of Greek tyrants, Italian pirates and Carthaginian sea-muscle. Continue reading Rome vs Carthage- Part 2: Trouble in Sicily

Rome vs Carthage- Part 1: A Tale of Two Cities

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“Ceterum autem censeo Carthaginem esse delendam”, says Cato the Elder, Roman statesman, finishing his speech; Furthermore, I think that Carthage must be destroyed.” However, that speech had not been about Carthage, a city lying opposite to Italy on the North African shore, at all. Yet Cato would always end his speeches with that quote, related or unrelated to Carthage. It was almost absurd.

How in the world did Carthage and Rome come to such hatred against each other?  Continue reading Rome vs Carthage- Part 1: A Tale of Two Cities

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